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 Intro to Competitive Play(Includes Standard Rules and Current Tier Lists)

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Kisame
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Join date : 2009-12-29
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PostSubject: Intro to Competitive Play(Includes Standard Rules and Current Tier Lists)   Tue Dec 29, 2009 9:34 pm

It's obvious some of you need serious help. But I won't post everything I should, since you need to do some trial-and-error work yourselves.

Introduction-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If you’re a dedicated trainer, you’ve probably battled the Elite Four so many times they sound like boring class lectures. You endured this for the sake of training your loyal Pokémon, and after turning them into the fullest they could be, maybe you wanted more. So you decided to battle your friends on Wi-Fi, but after pounding them mercilessly (or having cried “Uncle!” one too many times), maybe Pokémon began to get stale.

But there is more to this game. Something bigger.

This is the world of competitive Pokémon, the art of playing Pokémon to win. In this world, that 999 attack Pelipper you hacked as a joke to sweep your friend’s team isn’t allowed. Competitive Pokémon emphasizes an understanding of game mechanics, team organization, and battle tactics, rather than cramming four moves of differing types on your Pokémon and picking whichever one is super effective.

Now that I’ve gotten you interested, you’ll want to examine just what competitive Pokémon is about in more detail. You will first learn about the finer details of the game you may not have noticed, and then I'll give you a brief overview of the competitive world.

What To Expect--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The competitive Pokémon environment is drastically different from what most new players are used to. Unlike in the Gameboy and DS games, you play against human opponents. Outsmarting a hand-held machine is one thing, but outsmarting a real person is something else entirely. As such, there are a few key things to expect in competitive battling.

The first thing you need to know is that people will play to win. Although it was enough to get by in the cartridge games, using Pokémon because they are cool or your favorites is the fastest way to lose. Your opponents will be using whatever Pokémon they feel give them the best chance of winning, and in order to be competitive you should do the same.

One of the most surprising aspects to new players is the idea of switching. No longer will an opponent leave in a Pokémon until it faints; they can-and will-take advantage of the ability to bring in a new Pokémon with a better matchup. Also, do not be surprised if your opponent predicts your switch to hit you incoming Pokémon with a super effective attack, as most players will take advantage of obvious plays in order to gain some sort of advantage.

The role of luck in Pokémon comes as an unpleasant surprise to many new players. Between critical hits, chance effects such as burn and flinch, and attacks with less than perfect accuracy, the potential for lucky wins and losses is everywhere. At the end of the day, new players should realize that, while winning is important, any individual win is near meaningless. As in American Football, any given player can win on any given ladder match; what is more important is winning in the long run. The best player in the world can still lose, even to newcomers, but will likely be able to maintain a much higher win-loss ratio.

Competitive Clauses-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

In competitive Pokémon, there are several standard rules used in every match. These rules are called clauses, and they serve to stop some over-powerful strategies, reduce the role that luck can play in a match, and overall just make the game more enjoyable. If you are playing on a simulator, these rules will be enforced automatically; in wi-fi play, activating any one of these clauses will usually result in disqualification.

Standard Rules------------------------------------------------------
Evasion Clause
Moves that boost evasion (i.e. Double Team and Minimize) are not allowed.


Sleep Clause
Two or more Pokémon on a team cannot be asleep at the same time. Self-induce sleep via rest does not activate Sleep Clause. Effect Spore does not count towards that limit either apparently.


OHKO/Evasion Clause
One-Hit KO moves are not allowed.
Sometimes grouped together as "No DT/OHKO". The following moves are banned:
- Double Team
- Minimize
- Fissure
- Guillotine
- Sheer Cold
- Horn Drill

Species Clause
Two or more of the same Pokémon may not be used on the same team.

the following items are considered "Hax" Items and are banned:
- Brightpowder
- Quick Claw
- Focus Band
- King's Rock
- Scope Lens


Self KO Clause
If both players have only one Pokémon left, moves which KO both the user and the opponent are not allowed (e.g. Explosion, Destiny Bond).

Non-Standard Rules-----------------------------------------------

Item Clause
All Pokémon on a team must hold different items. This is not a standard clause in competitive play, but it is used in Nintendo tournaments. Additionally


Current Tier Lists--------------------------------------------
These are the most sought after pokemon. So they are mentioned on here for quick reference. BL/UU/NU pokemon have their own pages, as they are rarely used. Looks unorganized to me but apparently its easier.
the following are Generation 4 ubers. if they are also gen five it will say next to them.
Ubers
Arceus also gen 5
Darkrai also gen 5
Deoxys also gen 5
Deoxys-A also gen 5
Deoxys-D
Deoxys-S
Dialga also gen 5
Garchomp
Giratina also gen 5
Giratina-O also gen 5
Groudon also gen 5
Ho-oh also gen 5
Kyogre also gen 5
Latios
Lugia also gen 5
Manaphy also gen 5
Mew
Mewtwo also gen 5
Palkia also gen 5
Rayquaza also gen 5
Shaymin-S also gen 5
Wobbuffet
Wynaut
GEN 5 ONLY UBERS

Zekrom
Reshiram
Having drizzle and swift swim on the same team
the ability "inconsistant'

4th generation OverUsed, generation 5 will be added when released.
Aerodactyl
Azelf
Blissey
Breloom
Bronzong
Celebi
Dragonite
Dusknoir
Electivire
Empoleon
Flygon
Forretress
Gengar
Gliscor
Gyarados
Heatran
Hippowdon
Infernape
Jirachi
Jolteon
Kingdra
Lucario
Machamp
Magnezone
Mamoswine
Metagross
Ninjask
Rotom-C
Rotom-F
Rotom-H
Rotom-S
Rotom-W
Scizor
Skarmory
Smeargle
Snorlax
Starmie
Suicune
Swampert
Tentacruel
Togekiss
Tyranitar
Umbreon
Vaporeon
Weavile
Zapdos
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Intro to Competitive Play(Includes Standard Rules and Current Tier Lists)
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